“Lutosławski 2013 – Promesa”: Premiere of choreographic programme “Ogniwa” set to Witold Lutosławski’s music

15 listopada 2013

On Saturday, 16 November (7 pm) Szczecin’s opera house, Opera na Zamku (Opera Hall, ul. Energetyków 40), will present Ogniwa (Links), a programme of new choreographies set to Witold Lutosłwski’s compositions in which the music of the great Polish composer brings together artists from different parts of the globe. Lutosławski’s Little Suita, Musique funèbre, Chain No. 1 and No. 2, which are the choreographic programme’s musical setting, will be performed by the orchestra of Opera na Zamku in Szczecin conducted by Jerzy Wołosiuk.

Each part of the programme was choreographed by a different artist: two representatives of the younger generation in the person of Warsaw-based choreographer Kaya Kołodziejczyk, who has won a national competition for Poland’s emerging choreographers, and Piotr Czubowicz, dancer and choreographer of Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo, along with the phenomenal, experienced ballet artist, Robert Glumbek. The choreographic concept is an unusual combination of movement and emotion. Also contributing to the project has been Ilian Garnetz, Moldovian  violinist who has won the most prestigious violin competitions in the world.

Next presentation: 17 November 2013, 6 pm.

 

Grey Summer (Little Suita by W. Lutosławski) choreography by Piotr Czubowicz: see video

Aria di Prefiche (Musique funèbre by W. Lutosławski) choreography by Kaya Kołodziejczyk: see video

Pewnego razu – teraz, or Once Upon a Time – Now (Chain No. 1 and No. 2 by W. Lutosławski) choreography by Robert Glumbek: see video

 

Trailer

 

Ogniwa’s debut comes as part of the opera house’s project “Taniec z Lutosławskim” (A Dance with Lutosławski), which is supported financially by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of Poland under the programme “Lutosławski 2013 – Promesa”, implemented by the Institute of Music and Dance in Warsaw.

 

 

About the music

Witold Lutosławski, whose centenary of birth is celebrated by the whole musical world this year, is unequivocally one of the most prominent composers of the 20th century. His individual style is characteristic for brilliant instrumentation and masterful management of the form, both following from the artist’s excellent conducting technique perfected over many years of work and then modified systematically. The compositions which were selected for this ballet programme represent different stages of Lutosławski’s development as composer, providing different glimpses at his artistic personality.

Little Suita for chamber orchestra (1950) is the composer’s early work whose style is aligned with the politically-imposed aesthetics of social realism. These aesthetic guidelines stipulated that music should be communicative, cheerful and strongly linked to folklore. Although the composer himself would later emphasise that his early output had not been fully “independent” and had had a simply “subsidiary” role, it is impossible not to appreciate the excellent folk stylisation, rhythmic vigour and charming melodics of these pieces.

Musique funèbre (1954–1958) brought about a breakthrough in Lutosławski’s practice as the first attempt at taking full control of the musical material. The essence of this four-part composition, dedicated to the memory of Beli Bartok, are permutations of a twelve-note series correlated with strict polyphony. The composer himself would admit that, starting from this piece, he composed as he wanted, not as he was able to. Beginning and ending separate layers of the composition’s structure in an uneven manner is a characteristic feature of a group of Lutosławski’s pieces known under the name Chain.

Composed in 1984–85, Chain No. 2 for violin and orchestra juxtaposes parts played ad li bitum (at liberty) and passages played according to conductor’s instruction, a technique which has been termed as “limited aleatorism”. The piece features the specific “romantic tone”, particularly present in the way the melody is constructed, which will then return with twice the force in the composer’s last compositions.

 

Piotr Deptuch

 

Tickets: 16 Nov 2013, 7 pm

Premiere: PLN 40–60 B

Post-premiere performance 17 November (6 pm), Adults: PLN 30-45; Adolescents (19 yrs old or younger): PLN 15-22,5; University students: PLN 15-20 (seats II, III)

Group tickets for more than 10 people: PLN 20–35

Duration: ca. 1h30 (one intermission)

 

“Lutosławski 2013 – Promesa”: Premiere of choreographic programme “Ogniwa” set to Witold Lutosławski’s music powiększ
Project by: Agata Pełechaty.